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PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 5 Psychological Disorders

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 5 Psychological Disorders Free Sample Papers Anxiety (1) BS Psychology (119) Depression (11) Essay (2) MS Psychology (85) Need writer for your Psychology Papers? Get your paper in 24 Hours. We have a team of Psychology Academic Writers who can help you quickly write plagiarism-free papers, essays, and research articles. Hire Writer PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 5 Psychological Disorders Name Capella University PSY FPX 7310 Biological Basis of Behavior Prof. Name Date Bipolar Disorder: Understanding Behavior Introduction The human brain, with its intricate functions, is susceptible to various factors that can profoundly influence behavior. Despite our efforts, hormonal fluctuations, breakdowns, and environmental elements often elude our control, impacting behavior in unpredictable ways. Approximately 14% of the global population grapples annually with diagnosable psychological disorders, including bipolar disorder, a condition within the spectrum of mood disorders. This article explores the defining factors of bipolar disorder, their influence on behavior and experiences, and strategies psychologists employ to enhance the quality of life for individuals with bipolar disorder. Bipolar Disorder: Behavior Dynamics Bipolar disorder manifests as episodes of mania or hypomania, representing deviations from an individual’s typical behavior. Mania is characterized by euphoric or irritable mood shifts coupled with heightened energy levels, while hypomania reflects similar mood changes without significant behavioral alterations (Strakowski, 2014). These extreme symptoms exert a palpable influence on behavior, often resulting in erratic patterns. For instance, individuals may oscillate between periods of sleeplessness and lethargy, demonstrating the disorder’s unpredictable nature. Moreover, manic episodes can precipitate behaviors marked by excessive energy, impaired speech, impulsivity, and risk-taking tendencies (Ramirez Basco & Rush, 2005). Factors Influencing Bipolar Disorder While the precise causes of bipolar disorder remain unclear, several factors contribute to its development. Genetic predisposition, evidenced by familial patterns, suggests a hereditary component, with studies identifying specific gene variants linked to bipolar disorder (Kakiuchi et al., 2003). Additionally, prolonged exposure to high-stress environments or traumatic events can alter neural pathways, triggering manic episodes. Substance abuse, particularly alcohol and drugs, exacerbates symptomatology, inducing manic or hypomanic states (Mayo Group, 2019). Chemical imbalances in neurotransmitters and thyroid dysfunction further contribute to mood fluctuations, while brain cell damage, particularly in the hippocampus, can precipitate mood swings (Martinez-Aran et al., 2007). Cultural and Experiential Influences Lived experiences profoundly shape individuals’ perceptions of bipolar disorder, necessitating psychologists’ empathetic understanding. Cultural nuances significantly influence how symptoms are perceived and treated, underscoring the importance of cultural competence in diagnosis and intervention (Fink & Kraynak, 2005). Differential attitudes towards mental illness across cultures highlight the need for tailored treatment approaches that resonate with patients’ cultural backgrounds. Moreover, genetic variations among ethnic groups may impact treatment efficacy, emphasizing the need for personalized care (Fink & Kraynak, 2005). Efficacy and Ethical Considerations in Treatment Contemporary treatments for bipolar disorder encompass pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, albeit with varying efficacy. While mood-stabilizing drugs and psychotherapy represent standard interventions, their isolated use may yield suboptimal outcomes. Nonadherence to medication regimens poses a significant concern, with combined therapy yielding higher adherence rates and therapeutic benefits (Gaudiano et al., 2008). Ethical considerations in treatment mandate informed consent, transparency regarding treatment risks, and vigilant monitoring for adverse effects. Psychologists must exercise caution in prescribing medications, particularly those undergoing clinical trials, to mitigate potential harm (Carlson, 2014). Conclusion Bipolar disorder presents formidable challenges, impacting individuals’ lives and necessitating comprehensive treatment approaches. By elucidating the disorder’s behavioral dynamics, understanding contributing factors, and acknowledging cultural and experiential influences, psychologists can devise tailored interventions that optimize patient outcomes. Ensuring treatment adherence and ethical practice underscores the imperative of delivering holistic care, facilitating stability, and empowering individuals to navigate the complexities of bipolar disorder. References Carlson, N. R. (2014). Schizophrenia, Affective Disorders, and Anxiety Disorders (9th ed.). Pearson. Fink, C., & Kraynak, J. (2005). Bipolar Disorder for Dummies. Wiley Publishing. Gaudiano, B. A., Weinstock, L. M., & Miller, I. W. (2008). Improving treatment adherence in bipolar disorder: a review of current psychosocial treatment efficacy and recommendations for future treatment development. Behavior Modification, 32(3), 267–301. https://doi.org/10.1177/0145445507309023 Kakiuchi, C., Iwamoto, K., Ishiwata, M., Bundo, M., Kashahara, T., Kusumi, I., Tsujita, T., Okazaki, I., Kunugi, H., Sasaki, T., & Kato, T. (2003). Impaired feedback regulation of XBP1 as a genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder. Nature Genetics, 35(2), 171–175. Mayo Group. (2019). Bipolar disease. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseasesconditions/bipolar-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20355955 Martinez-Aran, A., Vieta, E., Torrent, C., Sanchez-Moreno, J., Goikolea, J. M., Salamero, M., Malhi, G., & Ayuso-Mateos, J. L. (2007). Functional outcome in bipolar disorder: The role of clinical and cognitive factors. Bipolar Disorders, 9, 103–113. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5618.2007.00327.x Mental Health First Aid. (2019). 5 Surprising Mental Health Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/2019/02/5-surprising-mental-health-statistics/ Ramirez Basco, M., & Rush, A. J. (2005). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Bipolar Disorders (2nd ed.). Guilford Publications. Strakowski, S. (2014). Bipolar Disorder: Bipolar Disorder. Oxford University Press. Ward, T. D. (2009). The lived experience of adult bipolar patients with comorbid substance use disorder (Order No. 3355960). ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global.   Also Read PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 5 Psychological Disorders Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Read More Load More

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries Free Sample Papers Anxiety (1) BS Psychology (119) Depression (11) Essay (2) MS Psychology (84) Need writer for your Psychology Papers? Get your paper in 24 Hours. We have a team of Psychology Academic Writers who can help you quickly write plagiarism-free papers, essays, and research articles. Hire Writer PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries Name Capella University PSY FPX 7310 Biological Basis of Behavior Prof. Name Date Abstract Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) present an escalating issue in modern society, predominantly stemming from sports activities. Among TBIs, mild concussions from moderate head-to-head contact are the most frequently diagnosed, presenting as headaches, dizziness, or mild nausea. While some TBIs are relatively minor, repetitive head trauma—common in professional American football, boxing, and hockey—can lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease. This paper delves into the accountability for concussions, examines the effects and potential coping strategies for CTE, and discusses ethical dilemmas faced by medical and psychological professionals. Enhanced scrutiny in the fields of safety and neurological care is necessary to address the increasing complexity of brain-related injuries. Introduction Contemporary athletes often risk their well-being in pursuit of sporting excellence. In sports such as football and boxing, frequent head impacts can result in traumatic brain injuries, particularly chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE, characterized by repetitive brain trauma, leads to progressive neurological deterioration. This paper explores the triggers of CTE, its emotional repercussions, and the societal challenges in effectively aiding affected individuals. The Interplay of Emotion and Behavior Emotions, whether positive or negative, are subjective reactions to events or situations, influencing behavior. The amygdala, located in the brain’s limbic system, governs emotional processing and bodily responses. Research indicates a correlation between emotions and behaviors, influenced by hormonal pathways linking the amygdala and hypothalamus. While negative emotions often correlate with adverse behaviors, prosocial behaviors like empathy also stem from emotional responses. Exploring Traumatic Brain Injuries and CTE Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) encompass alterations in brain function caused by external forces, prevalent in sports, battlefields, or accidents. Annually, approximately 1.7 million individuals seek medical attention for TBIs, with 2% of Americans experiencing TBI-related symptoms daily. Concussions, a common TBI subtype, are especially significant in sports, with an estimated 1.6-3.8 million occurrences annually in athletic contexts. The responsibility for TBI consequences remains contentious, with arguments for athlete autonomy balanced against the duty of care owed by sports organizations. Understanding the Impact of CTE on Emotions and Behaviors CTE, primarily affecting professional American football and boxing athletes, results from repetitive head trauma. Unlike concussions, CTE’s onset is not directly linked to single traumatic events. Instead, the accumulation of tau proteins leads to neurofibrillary tangles, causing symptoms such as memory loss, cognitive decline, and emotional instability. Behavioral changes, including impulsivity and aggression, often manifest years after repeated head trauma, posing significant challenges for diagnosis and management. Ethical Challenges in Addressing CTE and Traumatic Brain Injuries Ethical considerations are paramount in managing traumatic brain injuries, particularly in athletics, where notions of resilience often prevail. Honest communication among athletes, coaches, and medical professionals is crucial for ensuring proper treatment and safeguarding against harm. Professional sports organizations face ethical imperatives to prioritize athlete welfare and minimize risks, balancing competitive ambitions with long-term health concerns. Evidence-Based Interventions and Coping Mechanisms for CTE Patients with TBIs can access various interventions aimed at restoring cognitive function and emotional well-being. Brain Injury Coping Skills groups, facilitated by psychoeducators and psychotherapists, provide stress management and problem-solving strategies. Evidence suggests that group-based interventions enhance coping skills and functional outcomes, underscoring the importance of holistic approaches to TBI rehabilitation. Conclusion Traumatic brain injuries are a pressing issue in sports, ranging from mild concussions to debilitating conditions like CTE. Advances in neuroscience and heightened awareness of injury risks have prompted proactive measures in athlete safety and rehabilitation. By prioritizing prevention and comprehensive care, society aims to create a safer environment for athletes, emphasizing long-term well-being over short-term gains. PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries References Backhaus, S., Ibarra, S., Klyce, D., Trexler, L., & Malec, J. (2010). Brain injury coping skills group: A preventative intervention for patients with brain injury and their caregivers. Archives of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, 91, 840. Boren, C. (2018). A new study shows that hits to the head, not concussions, cause CTE. Washington: WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.proquest.com%2Fdocview%2F1988839360%3Faccountid%3D27965 Brain Injury Research Institute. (2020). What is a concussion. Retrieved from https://www.protectthebrain.org/Brain-Injury-Research/What-is-a-Concussion-.aspx Hein, S., Röder, M., & Fingerle, M. (2018). The role of emotion regulation in situational empathy‐related responding and prosocial behavior in the presence of negative affect. International Journal of Psychology, 53, 477-485. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002.ijop.12405 Pachman, S., & Lamba, A. (2017). Legal aspects of concussion: The ever-evolving standard of care. Journal of Athletic Training, 52(3), 186–194. https://doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-52.1.03 PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries Tharmaratnam, T., Iskandar, M. A., Tabobondung, T. C., Tobbia, I., Gopee-Ramanan, P., & Tabobondung, T. A. (2018). Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in professional American football players: Where are we now? Frontiers in Neurology, 9, 445. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2018.00445 Also Read PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 4 Traumatic Brain Injuries Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Read More Load More

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease Free Sample Papers Anxiety (1) BS Psychology (119) Depression (11) Essay (2) MS Psychology (83) Need writer for your Psychology Papers? Get your paper in 24 Hours. We have a team of Psychology Academic Writers who can help you quickly write plagiarism-free papers, essays, and research articles. Hire Writer PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease Name Capella University PSY FPX 7310 Biological Basis of Behavior Prof. Name Date Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia marked by cognitive impairments that affect memory, perception, and judgment (Carlson, 2014). Various physical causes, such as brain trauma or strokes, alongside other neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, can trigger its onset (Carlson, 2014). Early indicators of dementia might include simple forgetfulness, such as missing appointments or losing items, which can advance to more severe memory loss, like forgetting familiar places or even one’s identity (Carlson, 2014). Early detection of Alzheimer’s is crucial. Genetic predispositions and asymmetrical brain structures, identifiable through comparative MRI imaging, might provide insights into future risks (Mayo Clinic, 2019). Impact of Alzheimer’s Disease on Brain Structure and Function Alzheimer’s disease significantly impacts brain function, particularly affecting the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, which are crucial for memory formation (Brayne & Calloway, 2008). The degeneration also affects neural pathways responsible for emotions, problem-solving, and communication (Whitehouse, Maurer, & Ballenger, 2000). These structural changes in the brain can result in symptoms like paranoia, anxiety, and hallucinations (University of Queensland, 2019). Effects of Brain Changes on Learning and Memory As Alzheimer’s advances, atrophy in subcortical structures such as the cerebellum disrupts cognitive processes, leading to forgetfulness and slowed thinking (Barulli & Stern, 2018). Damage to neurotransmitters hampers learning and memory retention, with senile plaques in the brain’s grey matter further impeding information processing (Whitehouse, Maurer & Ballenger, 2000). The disease affects different types of memory, from short-term to procedural, causing language difficulties and challenges in completing tasks (Holger, 2013). Behavioral Impacts of Brain Changes Alzheimer’s disease profoundly alters behavior, leading to emotional instability and aggression due to damage to the amygdala (Page, 2019). Damage to the frontal lobe contributes to impulsive actions or obsessive-compulsive behaviors (Holger, 2013). These changes often occur without external triggers, impacting patients’ interactions and daily routines (Holger, 2013). Recent Advances in Alzheimer’s Research Recent research has focused on early diagnosis through biomarkers, aiming to identify hippocampal atrophy and genetic risk factors such as Apolipoprotein E4 (ApolE4) (Holger, 2013). Cognitive training techniques and targeted treatments offer hope for managing symptoms and delaying cognitive decline (Holger, 2013). Professional Relevance of Research Findings Understanding the latest findings on Alzheimer’s disease provides professionals with essential insights for diagnosis and treatment planning. Identifying biomarkers and assessing genetic risks allow for early interventions, improving patient care and quality of life (Holger, 2013). PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease References Barulli, D., & Stern, Y. (2018). Cognitive reserve: Theory, measurement, and evidence. In G. E. Smith & S. T. Farias (Eds.), APA handbooks in psychology®: APA handbook of dementia (pp. 357–368). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Brayne, C., & Calloway, P. (2008). Normal ageing, impaired cognitive function, and senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type: A continuum. The Lancet, 331, 1265. Fernandez, C. G., Hamby, M. E., McReynolds, M. L., & Ray, W. (2019). The role of APOE4 in disrupting the homeostatic functions of astrocytes and microglia in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 11. Mayo Clinic. (2019). Dementia. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013 Pistolato, F., Ohayon, E., Lamm, A., Langley, G., Novak, T., Pamies, D., & Harnad, D. (2016). Alzheimer disease research in the 21st century: Past and current failures, new perspectives and funding priorities. Oncotarget, 7, 38999. Tartaglia, M. C., Rosen, H. J., & Miller, B. L. (2011). Neuroimaging in dementia. Neurotherapeutics, 8, 82–92. PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease University of Queensland. (2019). What causes dementia? Retrieved from https://qbi.uq.edu.au/dementia/dementia-causes-and-treatment Also Read PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 3 Alzheimer’s disease Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 4 Read More Load More

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Free Sample Papers Anxiety (1) BS Psychology (119) Depression (11) Essay (2) MS Psychology (82) Need writer for your Psychology Papers? Get your paper in 24 Hours. We have a team of Psychology Academic Writers who can help you quickly write plagiarism-free papers, essays, and research articles. Hire Writer PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Name Capella University PSY FPX 7310 Biological Basis of Behavior Prof. Name Date Understanding the Impact of the Papez Circuit on Behavior and Memory Introduction The human mind, with its intricate components, significantly influences various life aspects. In psychology, the interplay between brain development and external factors raises questions about their effects on emotions and memory. According to the Papez circuit model (Heilman, 2002), changes in the brain due to developmental stages, external incidents, or the absence thereof can profoundly impact human behavior and memory. Key elements of this model, including the fornix, mammillary bodies, anterior thalamic nucleus, cingulate cortex, and hippocampus (Jacobson & Marcus, 2008), serve as crucial hubs for the daily traversal of emotions and memories. The Papez Circuit Neural Pathway Neurology examines the interactions of the nervous system with the brain, where neural pathways guide the transmission of messages and sensations (Mumenthaler & Mattle, 2006). The hippocampus, located deep within the temporal lobe, is central to the Papez circuit. This region is crucial for regulating motivation, emotion, learning, and memory, forming a significant part of the limbic system (Sinah Dutta, 2019). Sensory stimuli, such as smells, visuals, or sounds, are processed in the thalamus before being relayed to the cingulate cortex, where emotions develop. The hippocampus then stores these experiences, shaping memories influenced by various factors, including trauma or developmental abnormalities (Dharani, 2015). The body’s response to stimuli relies on the integrity of this neural pathway, with disruptions potentially altering behavioral outcomes. PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Impact on Behavior and Memory The preservation of memories and the regulation of behaviors depend on the Papez circuit’s integrity. Factors such as abuse, environmental influences, or genetic predispositions can disrupt this pathway, leading to memory deficits or emotional dysregulation (Kileen, 2020). Traumatic brain injuries can impair hippocampal function, resulting in memory impairments. Genetic conditions like dementia may predispose individuals to memory issues independently of Papez circuit disruptions. Lesions along this pathway often result in memory loss, with Alzheimer’s disease frequently being a significant concern (Dharani, 2015). Changes to the Papez circuit can also manifest as behavioral changes, with patients exhibiting shifts in temperament or social tendencies (Jacobson & Marcus, 2008). These findings highlight the intricate link between the Papez circuit, behavior, and memory, with disruptions leading to varied outcomes. Conclusion The Papez circuit is a critical neural pathway that governs behavior and memory. Its complex network, spanning key brain regions, underscores its importance in shaping human cognition and emotional responses. Understanding the complexities of this circuitry provides insights into neurological disorders and informs therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring cognitive function and emotional well-being. References Heilman, K. M. (2002). Matter of mind: A neurologist’s view of brain-behavior relationships. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Jacobson, S., & Marcus, E. (2008). Neuroanatomy for the neuroscientist. New York, NY: Springer. Dharani, K. (2015). The biology of thought: A neuronal mechanism in the generation of thought—A new molecular model. San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press. Mumenthaler, M., & Mattle, H. (2006). Fundamentals of neurology. New York, NY: Thieme Stuttgart. Kileen, S. Ed.S., NCSP. (2020, January 30). Personal interview. PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Sinah Dutta, S. (2019). Hippocampus Functions. Retrieved from https://www.news-medical.net/health/Hippocampus-Functions.aspx#2 Also Read PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 2 The Drive States Read More PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 4 Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 3 Teenage Pregnancy Read More Load More

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory

PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Free Sample Papers Anxiety (1) BS Psychology (119) Depression (11) Essay (2) MS Psychology (81) Need writer for your Psychology Papers? Get your paper in 24 Hours. We have a team of Psychology Academic Writers who can help you quickly write plagiarism-free papers, essays, and research articles. Hire Writer PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Name Capella University PSY FPX 7310 Biological Basis of Behavior Prof. Name Date The Influence of the Papez Circuit on Behavior and Memory Introduction The human brain, with its complex architecture, significantly affects various aspects of life, particularly emotions and memory. Within the field of psychology, understanding how brain development or trauma impacts these areas is crucial. According to the Papez circuit model (Heilman, 2002), specific brain regions, including the fornix, mammillary bodies, anterior thalamic nucleus, cingulate cortex, and hippocampus, play essential roles in regulating emotion and memory (Jacobson & Marcus, 2008). The Neural Pathway of the Papez Circuit Neurology explores the interactions between the nervous system and the brain, focusing on how messages and sensations travel through the nervous system, affecting various behaviors and phenomena (Mumenthaler & Mattle, 2006). Central to the Papez circuit is the hippocampus, located deep within the temporal lobe. This structure manages processes such as motivation, emotion, learning, and memory, contributing significantly to the limbic system’s functions (Dutta, 2019). The progression of emotions and sensations within this neural pathway is intricate. External stimuli, such as smells, sights, or sounds, are processed in the thalamus before being relayed to the sensory cortex. The cingulate cortex then facilitates the development of feelings, leading to the hippocampus’s crucial role in storing and forming memories. Trauma, accidents, or developmental issues can disrupt this process, resulting in memory impairment (Dharani, 2015). Effects of Papez Circuit Dysfunction Various factors, including abuse, environmental influences, and genetic predispositions, can disrupt the normal functioning of the Papez circuit, leading to memory deficits and altered behaviors (Kileen, 2020). Lesions along this pathway often result in varying degrees of memory loss, with Alzheimer’s disease being a potential outcome (Dharani, 2015). Additionally, changes to the Papez circuit can lead to altered behavioral responses, such as increased aggression or introversion, demonstrating the complex relationship between brain structure and behavior (Jacobson & Marcus, 2008). PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Conclusion In conclusion, the Papez circuit significantly impacts memory and behavior. Dysfunction within this neural pathway can lead to memory impairments and altered emotional responses, highlighting the importance of understanding its mechanisms in neurological research. References Dharani, K. (2015). The biology of thought: A neuronal mechanism in the generation of thought—A new molecular model. San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press. Dutta, S. S. (2019). Reviewed by Sally Robertson, B.Sc. News Medical Life Sciences. Retrieved from [website link]. Heilman, K. M. (2002). Matter of mind: A neurologist’s view of brain-behavior relationships. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Jacobson, S., & Marcus, E. (2008). Neuroanatomy for the neuroscientist. New York, NY: Springer. Kileen, S. (2020, January 30). Personal interview. Retrieved from [website link]. PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Mumenthaler, M., & Mattle, H. (2006). Fundamentals of neurology. New York, NY: Thieme Stuttgart. Also Read PSY FPX 7310 Assessment 1 The Papez Circuit:It’s Effect on Behavior and Memory Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 4 Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 3 Teenage Pregnancy Read More PSY FPX 7230 Assessment 2 Emotional Management: The Impact of Hegemonic Masculinity on Adolescent Boys Read More Load More

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